Mar 21

Many people do not wish to relinquish ownership of their much loved horse by selling it and pocketing the funds, they would prefer to put it out on loan.They may not want to lose touch or control over the animal which is so often the case when sold.

This decision in many ways is an altruistic one, having the future welfare of the animal at heart. However, more and more frequently we are hearing about cases where horses have been loaned out and sold on, sub loaned to other people or worse still, sent to slaughter. In nearly all of these cases a robust loan agreement will not have been used, references will not have been obtained, the owner may have failed to stay in regular contact with the loanee and the new home is unlikely to have been inspected.

Horses4Homes would like to encourage people to continue to loan their horses but to do so in a way that reduces the risks of it going wrong.

By using the Horses4Homes facility users are given the support and guidance necessary to help them make the right choices when choosing who to loan their horse to. All applicants are screened to ensure only those which are most suitable are sent to owners for consideration saving them considerable time and worry.

The advice available on our site will vastly limit the risks of your loan going wrong. All loans dealt with by Horses4Homes will be given a re-home agreement outlining the exact loaning criteria specific to that loan, detailing any prohibitions of the loan and a new home inspection service is available should you be unable to check out the home yourself.

All applicants have to provide referee details and be able to demonstrate their ability to take on the responsibility of the horse.

It is entirely free to list your horse on our site, Horses4Homes simply register, read our rehoming help and list your horse.

Horses4Homes recommends that all those considering to loan out their horse;

  • Use Horses4Homes to screen potential loanees
  • Keep a copy of the horse’s passport
  • Get the horse freezemarked and do not pass the records to the loanee
  • Update the National Equine Database, become associated with your horse and flag that it is out on loan
  • Inspect the new home
  • Visit the horse regularly and obtain regular updates from the loanee

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