Donation Type: Loan   Donation Number: H4H3927447   Views: 772   Horse Owner: rebeccam Contact seller   Updated On: May 12, 2018

Fantastico


Fantastico - Andalusian - Coloured

If you choose to apply for this horse and are selected as the most suitable applicant you will be required to pay the standard donation of £50 which includes the cost of a rehome, loan or share agreement, and the work undertaken by the charity. The following additional donation and commitment has been requested by the owner to be paid to the charity by the successful applicant in respect of their horse:

  • make a one-off donation of £350 to Horses4Homes Foundation

Please take note:

  • All horses must first be applied for before any visits are arranged
  • It is possible to ask owners questions via the messaging system prior to submitting an application
  • All applicants are encouraged to have the horse examined by a vet prior to rehoming, loaning or sharing
  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 300 miles radius from the current horse location
  • New home to be inspected by welfare representative
Fantastico (Tico) is a stunning buckskin PRE x Lusitano gelding who is now 6 years old. He has been professionally backed and produced by Esperanza Dressage and has been to dressage competitions achieving scores of 67%. He has a high scoring walk and lovely canter. He is easy to handle in all respects and has a loving nature. Video https://youtu.be/p5eCawDgj7k

Owned since
November 2015
Sex
Gelding
Height
15.2 hands
Breed
Andalusian (Part Breed)
Age
6 years
Colour
Coloured
Passport number
724901000045613
Passport Registration Agency
British Association for the Purebred Spanish Horse
Available for rehoming with tack and rugs
No
Level of rider
Advanced
Reason for re-home/share
Insufficient time to look after it
Horse is involved in the following activities
Daily hacking, Schooling, Unaffiliated Competitions, Affiliated Competitions, Dressage, Showing
Need to be stabled at night?
Yes, but only in winter
Need to be put on restricted grazing to limit weight gain?
No
Horse vaccinated annually for flu and tetanus
Yes
Maximum weight this horse can carry
70 kg
Is the horse in work?
Yes full work

  • Most suitable home and loanee/owner/sharer

    Tico is still quite green and a sensitive ride so he needs someone quiet and experienced with young horses who has time to exercise him regularly. He has a lot of potential for dressage with good paces and he is very beautiful so could also do well in ridden showing classes. He is registered with BAPSH as a category IV so is eligible to attend GBPRE as a part bred.

  • Details of the tack used to ride the horse

    Snaffle bit , D ring with copper rollers, with a flash noseband. Dressage saddle

  • Horse is involved in the following activities

    Daily hacking, Schooling, Unaffiliated Competitions, Affiliated Competitions, Dressage, Showing

157 centimeters
62 inches

Restrictions

  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 300 miles radius from the current horse location

Please enter your postcode to check if you are within the radius (300 miles):      

Relevant health or lameness issues

He has never been lame or ill whilst I have owned him.

Veterinary examinations or treatment given in the past 12 months

No veterinary treatment.

Details of the veterinary practice this horse is registered with

Eamon Smyth | 07855 272272 | Equivet Mobile Horse Veterinary Services - Greyfriars' Equine Unit Greyfriars, Hog's Back, Puttenham, Surrey, GU3 1AG | Office@equi-vet.co.uk | equi-vet.co.uk

Please describe your horses behaviour in traffic

He has only seen very limited traffic, as we hack off road.

Please describe your horses behaviour when hacking out alone and in company

In company and alone he is good and doesn't get excited . He can be spooky, which is why he needs an experienced rider as he needs confidence from the rider. When you have this is he is really good to ride and straight forward.

Details of any individual behavioural traits which may influence the type of person best suited to take on the horse

He can be spooky at home in the arena more than out hacking, which is why he needs a confidence giving rider. He has been good to travel to shows and out schooling.He is very sweet and easy to handle and light to ride.For the right person he is a super horse.

Details of the activities that the horse must not participate in due to previous injury

No

Details of any problems when being ridden

No bucking or napping. He can be spooky but as mentioned before with the right rider this is not an issue.

Horse vaccinated annually for flu and tetanus

Yes

Need to be stabled at night?

Yes, but only in winter

Need to be put on restricted grazing to limit weight gain?

No


Restrictions

  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 300 miles radius from the current horse location

Please enter your postcode to check if you are within the radius (300 miles):      
The Andalusian, also known as the Pure Spanish Horse or PRE (Pura Raza Española), is a horse breed developed in the Iberian Peninsula. Its ancestors have been present on the Iberian Peninsula for thousands of years. The Andalusian has been recognized as an individual breed since the 15th century, and its conformation has changed very little over the centuries. Throughout its history, it has been known for its prowess as a war horse, and was prized by the nobility. The breed was used as a tool of diplomacy by the Spanish government, and kings across Europe rode and owned Spanish horses. During the 19th century, warfare, disease and crossbreeding reduced herd numbers dramatically, and despite some recovery in the late 19th century, the trend continued into the early 20th century. Exports of Andalusians were restricted until the 1960s, but the breed has since spread throughout the world, despite still-low population numbers. As of 2003, there were over 75,000 registered living Andalusians worldwide.

    Strongly built, and compact yet elegant, Andalusians have long, thick manes and tails. Their most common coat color is gray, although they can be found in many other colors. They are known for their intelligence, sensitivity and docility. A sub-strain within the breed known as the Carthusian, is considered by breeders to be the purest strain of Andalusian, though there is no genetic evidence for this claim. The strain is still considered separate from the main breed however, and is preferred by breeders because buyers pay more for horses of Carthusian bloodlines. There are several competing registries keeping records of horses designated as Andalusian or PRE, but they differ on their definition of the Andalusian and PRE, the purity of various strains of the breed, and the legalities of stud book ownership. At least one lawsuit is in progress as of 2010 to determine the ownership of the Spanish PRE stud book.

    The Andalusian is closely related to the Lusitano of Portugal, and has been used to develop many other breeds, especially in Europe and the Americas. Breeds with Andalusian ancestry include many of the warmbloods in Europe as well as western hemisphere breeds such as the Azteca. Over its centuries of development, the Andalusian breed has been selected for athleticism and stamina. The horses were originally used for classical dressage, driving, bullfighting, and as stock horses. Modern Andalusians are used for many equestrian activities, including dressage, show jumping and driving. The breed is also used extensively in movies, especially historical pictures and fantasy epics.

    The Andalusian breed has over the centuries been consistently selected for athleticism. In the 17th century, referring to multi-kilometer races, Cavendish said, "They were so much faster than all other horses known at that time that none was ever seen to come close to them, even in the many remarkable races that were run."

    From the very beginning of their history, Andalusians have been used for both riding and driving. Among the first horses used for classical dressage, they are still making a mark in international competition in dressage today. At the 2002 World Equestrian Games, two Andalusians were on the bronze-medal winning Spanish dressage team, a team that went on to take the silver medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics.

    Today, the breed is increasingly being selectively bred for increased aptitude in classical dressage. Historically, however, they were also used as stock horses, especially suited to working with Iberian bulls, known for their aggressive temperaments. They were, and still are, known for their use in mounted bull fighting. Mares were traditionally used for la trilla, the Spanish process of threshing corn practiced until the 1960s. Mares, some pregnant or with foals at their side, spent full days trotting over the corn. As well as being a traditional farming practice, it also served as a test of endurance, hardiness and willingness for the maternal Andalusian lines.