Donation Type: Loan   Donation Number: H4H5130513   Views: 2782   Horse Owner: lizziematthews   Updated On: Feb 13, 2021
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Sassy

Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut
Sassy - Morab - Liver Chestnut

If you choose to apply for this horse and are selected as the most suitable applicant you will be required to pay the standard donation of £50 which includes the cost of a rehome, loan or share agreement, and the work undertaken by the charity. The following additional donation and commitment has been requested by the owner to be paid to the charity by the successful applicant in respect of their horse:

  • make a one-off donation of £150 to Horses4Homes Foundation

Please take note:

  • All horses must first be applied for before any visits are arranged
  • It is possible to ask owners questions via the messaging system prior to submitting an application
  • All applicants are encouraged to have the horse examined by a vet prior to rehoming, loaning or sharing
  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 100 miles radius from the current horse location
  • New home to be inspected by welfare representative
Sassy is a very friendly, cheerful little soul. Enjoys her work. She likes human and equine company. She has done lots of hacking and some graded endurance & pleasure rides. Sassy is forward going and needs a quiet confident rider. Once you have her trust she will do anything for you. She is a joy to handle. Sassy needs someone who wants to ride regularly and spend time with her. She has done a bit of natural horsemanship. Could sign over ownership after successful loan period.

Owned since
May 2016
Sex
Mare
Height
14.2 hands
Breed
Morab (Part Breed)
Age
13 years
Colour
Liver Chestnut
Passport number
8260009BMHSPB302
Passport Registration Agency
British Morgan Horse Society
Available for rehoming with tack and rugs
Yes
Level of rider
Advanced
Reason for re-home/share
As I am getting older I am becoming more nervous of riding.I am planning on retirement in a few years and would like to be able to travel more.
Horse is involved in the following activities
Daily hacking, Schooling, Unaffiliated Competitions, Endurance
Need to be stabled at night?
Yes, but only in winter
Need to be put on restricted grazing to limit weight gain?
No
Horse vaccinated annually for flu and tetanus
Yes
Maximum weight this horse can carry
9.5 stones
Is the horse in work?
Yes full work

  • Most suitable home and loanee/owner/sharer

    Sassy needs to be kept with at least one other horse. She is used to living out with free access to come and go from her stable, as she wishes. She would enjoy a quiet yard and would not enjoy being kept in her stable too much, although she likes to go in there to get out of the weather. Sassy enjoys her work and needs someone confident who is willing to take the time to get to know her. She has loads of energy & will be anxious until trust is built. She needs to be ridden regularly. An adult ridder.

  • Details of the tack used to ride the horse

    Endurance Zilco bridle. French link bit. Running martingale. Wintec saddle.

  • Horse is involved in the following activities

    Daily hacking, Schooling, Unaffiliated Competitions, Endurance

147 centimeters
58 inches

Restrictions

  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 100 miles radius from the current horse location

Please enter your postcode to check if you are within the radius (100 miles):      

Relevant health or lameness issues

When I first got Sassy she had sweet itch. Since moving to the far west of Cornwall she has not suffered, probably because we don't have trees to encourage midges. It is likely she would need to be turned out in a fly rug in the summer months.

Veterinary examinations or treatment given in the past 12 months

No treatment in last 12 months.

Details of the veterinary practice this horse is registered with

Rosevean Practice | 01736362215 | Rosevean House, Penzance, TR18 3HU | [email protected] | www.roseveanvets.co.uk

Please describe your horses behaviour in traffic

She is pretty good in traffic although I generally ride on quiet roads. She is more likely to be frightened of what is in the hedge than a car.

Please describe your horses behaviour when hacking out alone and in company

I usually hack alone and we go out around 3 -4 times per week. She is keen on the way home. If she is in the company of a lot of horses she would get excitable. Out riding she is likely to kick out an unknown horse who gets up too close behind her. Once she gets to know a regular riding companion she is unlikely to kick out. I believe she is quite nervous of unknown horses. We have done lots of hacking together and she appears to enjoy this.

Details of any individual behavioural traits which may influence the type of person best suited to take on the horse

She needs a confident, light weight rider. She is forward going and can be spooky. She is not suitable for a nervous or novice rider. She is very easy to handle and loves human company. She is easy to load, travel, clip. She is good with traffic although I only ride on quiet roads. ( She does not like strings of motorcycles -especially if they pass at speed). She has completed pleasure rides and graded endurance rides. I have taken her to the beach, long hacks and initially a few jumps.

Details of the activities that the horse must not participate in due to previous injury

No. She did have tendon injury a few years ago. I have done 25 miles endurance rides since. As far as I am aware the injury has now resolved.

Explanation whether this horse is simply a good doer or whether he is prone to laminitis

But if not exercised regularly will need restricted grazing as is a good doer.

Details of any problems when being ridden

No, she is forward going and can be a bit spooky. She may put in a buck if she gets excitable. On the way home on a hack she becomes more keen.

Horse vaccinated annually for flu and tetanus

Yes

Need to be stabled at night?

Yes, but only in winter

Need to be put on restricted grazing to limit weight gain?

No


Restrictions

  • If you want to apply for this horse you should be within 100 miles radius from the current horse location

Please enter your postcode to check if you are within the radius (100 miles):      

Morab

The Morab is a breed of horse originally developed through the cross-breeding of Arabian and Morgan horses. The breeding of Morab horses began in the late 1880s with the intent of creating a fine carriage horse that was still substantial enough for moderate farm labor. The modern Morab continues this tradition of paired power and elegance, being both attractive and competitive show animals, and strong but mild-mannered work and family horses.

The Morab is a breed developed from Arabian and Morgan lineage, and retains many characteristics of both breeds. Typical conformation is compact, with powerful but sleek muscle structure and substantial bone structure, while remaining refined and elegant. The Morab's neck is deep-set, strong, and arched, providing for easy breathing and fluid mobility. Morabs, like some other horse breeds of heavy Arabian ancestry, have a compact build and shorter back length, with a well-developed undercarriage and good propulsion from behind. The Morab's hindquarters are generally powerfully built, possessing substantial muscle and bone. The forequarters are typically built very strongly as well, with a large, sloping shoulder and wide deep chest. Legs are rather thick, due to Morgan-influenced bone structure. They have comparatively short cannon bones, and solid, well-developed hooves.

The Morab head is generally very refined, carrying the Arabian's concave profile and wide forehead to some degree, while also displaying a more strongly muscled jaw and more substantial muzzle, typical of Morgan infuence. The eyes are large, bright, and expressive, and afford the horse a very wide field of vision. The ears are generally small and alert, and are often fluted or tipped. Many Morabs have a thick and abundant mane and tail, often wavy and flowing, and "flagged" tail carriage, indicative of both Morgan and Arabian parantage

Morab color:

  • All solid colors exist within the Morab breed, with bay, chestnut, and gray being the most common. Dilution-factor coloration, such as buckskin and palomino, also occurs frequently, owing largely to Morgan influence, as dilution-factor genes do not occur in the Arabian breed. Tobiano, overo, and Appaloosa colorations are not acceptable, as neither parent breed displays such patterns. Roaning is occasionally seen, as is the dun pattern, although both are rare in the Morab.
  • White markings on the face and legs are acceptable, and are somewhat common.
  • The sabino spotting pattern does occur in some Morabs, due to the presence of sabino coloration in select Arabian bloodlines used in foundation Morab breeding

 
Morab size:

  • The size range of Morabs is quite broad, due to the involvement of extensive lineages from both Arabian and Morgan breeds. Generally, Morabs stand between 14.2 and 15.2 hands (58 to 62 inches, 147 to 157 cm) high, but individuals can range from 14.0 and 16.0 hands (56 to 64 inches, 142 to 163 cm) or larger


Morab weight:

  • 950 to 1200 pounds.


Morab temperament:

  • The Morab's temperament and personality is best described as a true combination of the Morgan and the Arabian. Morabs are generally very intelligent, curious, and personal horses. They are often very quick to learn, and establish strong relationships with humans, who they are eager to please. Morabs make excellent family horses, and are sometimes used as lesson and therapy horses.


Morab origin:

  • This breed was developed in America in the early 1800s. Generally, the horse was an Arabian-Morgan mix and was given space in both stud books until the 1930s. The Arabian-Morgan cross was perhaps most successful in 1854 when the Stallion Golddust was born. Golddust was known for his trotting speed, which he passed on to his progeny. The Civil War hampered further Morab breeding and it wasn't until the eccentric millionaire William Randolph Hearst took an interest in the Arabian-Morgan cross that the horse regained some of its past reputation. It was at this time that the Morab name was applied.


Morab uses:

  • The modern Morab continues this tradition of paired power and elegance, being both attractive and competitive show animals, and strong but mild-mannered work and family horses.


Morab influence:

  • 1. Arabian 2. Morgan 3. Quarter Horse.


Morab interesting facts:

  • Golddust was produced by L.L. Dorsey in 1854. This stallion was the result of crossing an Arab mare (daughter of the famous stallion Zilcaddie) to a stallion registered Vermont Morgan 69. Golddust was said to be one of the most beautiful horses of his time, and most talented. In 1861, in a match race for $10,000, he defeated Iron Duke